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Monday, 3 July 2017

Season's end

Two months and it’s over. It all started in the advancing light of morning just two months ago. The first lobster fishery for the year started for part of Prince Edward Island, and my husband and I joined families and friends of the fishers as boats headed out to set lobster traps.




Now the traps have been pulled out of the water at season's end.




On the last day of the fishery, we were on the east coast of the island, watching from shore as boats left empty, then headed home, laden with their gear. 




It has been a successful season, the lobster plentiful and the prices good according to all accounts. In August, another group of fishers will have their turn at the crustaceans.


We travelled along the coast that day and stopped in several places where the boats could be seen in the distance off-shore. 




In North River Harbour, by mid afternoon, many vessels had returned and were tied up, 




their traps unloaded on the wharf. 




People hung out together on their boats and on the wharf, the atmosphere up-beat.




Bluefin tuna season is on the horizon.





28 comments:

  1. A busy place! Always something going on where boats and fishermen are around on the dock.

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    1. It was great to see the end of the season after having seen the start of it, Shammickite.

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  2. Beautiful photos indeed of the coast and boats, and lobster fishery sounds really interesting. Warm greetings!

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    1. I love watching the boats at their work, Blogoratti.

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  3. Beautiful photos. My experience with fisheries (of all types) has been they are needing good regulations or we will remove everything from the ocean. The additional pressure of climate change heats the ocean, and the basic food web starting with corals and plankton is dying, we will miss those delicious lobsters. But for now we an enjoy!

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    1. I come from a place which was devastated when the cod stock was over-fished. The moratorium on cod fishing is twenty-five years old now. It looks like the stock has begun to recover but what will happen as the ocean warms? There are many unknowns...it scarea me to think of it. For now, we exist in our little bubble...

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  4. Being a softie, I'm glad the season is over and rejoice that lots of lobsters are probably still around, for the next group of fishermen, I guess. I stopped eating lobsters when I discovered how they are prepared. But in any event, I love your pictures and am so glad you are sharing your lovely island with me. :-)

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    1. The lobsters have a reprieve now, Jan, for several weeks anyway.

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  5. ooooh how beautiful, there is no place in the world i would rather be!!!!

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    1. The blues never looked so blue as they do this year, SW. Maybe it's my eyesight.

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  7. It's so good that there's such strict control re the size and number of lobsters and crays caught Marie, at least when the season ends the stocks can multiply again. Such a pretty spot here.

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    1. There are lots of regulations, PDP.

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  8. Such a short season. I am glad that it was a good one (except for the lobsters) and love seeing more of your beautiful island.

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    1. We are seeing parts of the eastern side of the island for the first time this year, EC. We love it.

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  9. Your photos and words tell the story well. How fast seasons can change and then you move on to the next one. Glad it was a good lobster season. I enjoy these life slices of island living.

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    1. Thanks, Bill. I love exploring the island.

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  10. Look at all of those traps. Does the second wave trap in the same area or a different area?

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  11. The second fishery is in a different area, AC.

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  12. I've always wondered what it would be like to live near this much water. I grew up near the Detroit River. The river being there always made me feel comfortable for some reason. I miss it now. At least there is the Missouri here to be a substitute.

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  13. There is a primal draw in us for the water I think, Ratty.

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  14. As you know by now, Marie, I'm so enthralled by the fishing ports all over the world and so much admire those who do all the hard work, season in and season out. How lucky we are to see it all through the eyes of each other!

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    1. The world has gotten so much smaller, Ginnie!

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  15. Glad it was a successful season.

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  16. You captivate us with these beautiful images.

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