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Wednesday, 12 July 2017

The lighthouse at St. Peter's Harbour

It looks battered and worn as you approach the shore.





This lighthouse at St. Peter’s Harbour was deactivated in 2008. Until recently, the old building was hidden behind the sand dunes which had grown in size since 1881 when the structure was built.


However, it wasn’t the end of the old lighthouse because a local group, The St. Peter’s Lighthouse Society, has acquired the old structure and is restoring it to its former glory. Initial work is well underway and the whole structure has been lifted four feet.




Now it stands above the dunes and out of the sand again. Work to repair the old building will continue.




As my husband and I moved through the trail 





lined with bayberry and other bushes,





sparrows competed with the ocean sounds. Dozens of them sang and flitted through the shrubs, meters from the beach on the far side of the dunes.


This beach




is on the western shore of the entrance to St. Peter’s Bay while the National Park at Greenwich is visible on the eastern shore. 




The beach is similar to Greenwich, though with less people.


There was a wharf on this shore at one time, at the entrance to St Peter’s Bay. All that remains now are the weathered supports 





which are battered during every storm and some of which disappear in high tide.




The old wood, bleached from the sea and sun, shows character and history.


Here, at the area where the water of St. Peter’s Bay meets the Gulf of St Lawrence you can see the turbulence on the surface of the water. However, the water is warm at this low tide.





As we roam the beach, we notice holes in the sand. 




These are made by razor clams, which people dig, gather and cook. We have never eaten these but an excursion to dig for them would be a great adventure.




Meanwhile, in the tops of the sand dunes, bank swallows have made their nests, though they are not circling overhead today.




This beach at St. Peter's Harbour has a unique character though it is a pristine beach like so many others on the island.


34 comments:

  1. Gorgeous photos of your island Marie, love seeing them. The lighthouse is such an unusual shape, well...for us, it looks very unique. So pleased it is being preserved - good on the people who are putting the effort and work into it. We don't have bayberries here....nice to seeing something different like that. We do have sparrows though, they seem to breed in abundance here, but nonetheless they always seem to be happy little things. And oh the wood on your shoreline, I love it when it goes all white like that.

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    1. I love the look of that wood, Ann. It was an unusual sight here.

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  2. I'm glad people are banding together to save that old lighthouse!

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  3. Really interesting about the lighthouse. Wonderful photos indeed and thanks for sharing!

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    1. It was a great vidit there. Thanks for visiting, Blogoratti.

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  4. It makes me so happy to hear about rescues like this, it would have been so easy to let the windmill to the way of the old wharf! Thank goodness for rescue societies all over the world! Lovely series of images Marie✨

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    1. It is a great effot for sure, PDP.

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  5. I like lighthouses. I've never seen a functioning one, so pictures like yours are the next best thing.

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    1. I cannot imagine never having seen a lighthouse, Ratty.

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  6. There is a LOT of work in that rescue - and I am so glad that it is going ahead.
    Loved, as always, walking with you.

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    1. The group finished this work the day before we were there, EC.

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  7. I enjoyed the lovely photos. Lighthouses have always fascinated me.

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  8. It's wonderful that the lighthouse is being looked after again. It's important to save them so future generations can enjoy them too. Your beaches look so pretty and you both must really enjoy your walks along its shore. Thanks for sharing, Marie and have a wonderful day.

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    1. It is important for our grandchildren to see this important part of island history, Bill.

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  9. A truly lovely place. I'm glad that there are people who are about the lighthouse and are trying to restore it. You live in a very interesting part of the world, Marie. Thanks for bringing it into my living room. :-)

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    1. People will work together for the heritage of their community here, Jan.

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  10. I enjoyed seeing another lighthouse on your world and getting to know about its history.
    I wonder about how the old wood have been bleaching there! There are so many interesting things to see at the harbor,Marie.

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  11. All so beautiful! I'm glad the lighthouse is being restored. Oh how nice to stroll along a beach, I wish I was there right now instead of sitting here at my laptop watching the raindrops outside the window! At least I don't have to water my beans today.

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    1. There is a positive side to the rain, anyway.

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  12. such a cool looking lighthouse, a very interesting shape!! i have never heard of razor clams, nor have i ever noticed holes like that at our beaches. i LOVE regular clams!!!

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    1. We've never eaten them either, Debbie. They are quite sharp so you have to be careful digging them.

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  13. Whau! I love the natural beauty in this place! It's astonishing! The razor clams sounds like a great thing to eat. I love sea food! Thanks for sharing!

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  14. "Pristine" is the perfect word for your show-and-tell here, Marie. And what a delight to see a lighthouse that is not only being preserved but refurbished. I've seen the shells of many razor clams in my lifetime but never once thought about the fact they could be eaten. Dear me. I wonder what they would taste like in a nice buttery-garlic sauce!

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    1. I hope to have some razor clams in the near future, Ginnie.

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    1. The beaches here are incredible, Mage.

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  16. I love to see old buildings being saved. What magic it will be when it is finished.

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    1. We hope to visit there next year to see the progress, Barbara.

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